Mentalities in Different Cultures

In a globalized world with global flows of finance and goods, one might think that thinking is also becoming global. But this is not so. There are significant differences in the way people from different cultures think. Not only can these differences make new things possible economically, but if the roots of this thinking are not understood, they can also lead to conflict.

In many cases, different views of the world and philosophies of life clash. Philosophy of life must not be confused with knowledge. Because of different views, we have different understandings of realities. We can only try to learn more about the views of others in order to find certain common points as a starting point for dialogs.

Therefore, it makes sense to think about different cultural groups relevant to business, to work out essential differences and to explain them to some extent in terms of cultural history. The following schematic representations capture essential differences to the German mentality. Of course, there are significant differences within countries, and of course people are not all the same. Consider the statements made as initial, useful working hypotheses.

Look to the Brisishmentality, the Swiss mentality, the Austrian mentality, the Spanish mentality, the Dutch mentality, the Scandinavian mentality, the French mentality, the Turkish mentality, the US-American mentality, the Italian mentality, the Latin American mentality, the Indian mentality, the Chinese mentality, the Japanese mentality, the Russian mentality, and the Arab mentality.

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